The Resource We found a hat, Jon Klassen

We found a hat, Jon Klassen

Label
We found a hat
Title
We found a hat
Statement of responsibility
Jon Klassen
Creator
Author
Illustrator
Subject
Genre
Language
  • eng
  • eng
  • eng
Summary
Two turtles find a hat that looks good on both of them, but, with fairness in mind, they decide to leave it be, until night falls and one of the turtles changes its mind
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Character
Illustration
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2017.
  • Booklist Editors’ Choice: Books for Youth, 2016.
  • School Library Journal Best Books, 2016.
Review
  • Grades K-2 /* Starred Review */ In this concluding volume of a thematic trilogy, Klassen employs all his trademark dry wit and deadpan humor to tell the story of a hat-related caper. Unlike its predecessors (I Want My Hat Back, 2011, and This Is Not My Hat, 2012), the hat in question has already been found. Two big-eyed turtles stumble across a white cowboy hat in the middle of the desert and take turns trying it on. It suits them both, they decide: “But it would not be right if one of us had a hat and the other did not. There is only one thing to do. We must leave the hat here and forget that we found it.” This is easier said than done: as they watch the sunset and go to sleep, one turtle in particular just can’t keep his mind off the hat. Most of the story is told through that turtle’s expressive eyes, as it glances furtively between its companion and the hat. The three-part narrative has a distinctly western feel, complete with a desert setting drawn in dusty pink and brown tones—and then, of course, there’s the sense of impending betrayal. The conclusion might surprise even those familiar with Klassen’s twist endings, and the growing tensions, simple narrative, and intriguing details will endear this to many. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: An extensive author tour and national publicity campaign are just the tip of the marketing-plan iceberg for this latest from Caldecott-winning Klassen. -- Reagan, Maggie (Reviewed 6/1/2016) (Booklist, vol 112, number 19, p124)
  • /* Starred Review */ PreS-Gr 3—The conclusion to the "Hat" trilogy offers the sly humor fans have come to expect along with a surprisingly tender ending. When a pair of googly-eyed tortoises find a 10-gallon hat—which they both agree would look good on either of them—they decide to leave it be rather than risk inequity between them. But as should be expected of any Klassen animal in close proximity to headgear, it becomes obvious that one of the tortoises still very much covets the hat. As in his previous works, Klassen takes a minimalist approach, with an economy of words and simple, textured shapes. The repetition of certain phrases and the organization of the title into three parts make this entry flow like an easy reader. Full-page compositions showcase the bare desert landscape, with soft gradients of muted orange as the sole bit of color in the gray and black palette. Fans of the previous "Hat" books who follow the subtle clues and motivations will likely suspect an ironic ending. In a charming turn, the conflict is resolved through empathy and the bonds of friendship—Klassen's animals have clearly evolved in their thinking since the bear in I Want My Hat Back and the fish in This Is Not My Hat. The lightest touch of the surreal adds to the dreamy melancholy of this tale. VERDICT A different but wholly delightful and thought-provoking capper to Klassen's ingenious series.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal --Kiera Parrott (Reviewed 08/01/2016) (School Library Journal, vol 62, issue 8, p78)
  • /* Starred Review */ Klassen's I Want My Hat Back and This Is Not My Hat stand alone, but they also form a setup for this tale, in which two turtles stumble upon a big white hat in the desert ("We found a hat. We found it together") and try it on in turn ("It looks good on both of us"). Klassen's artwork, spare and sly, tells a different story. The hat does not look good. It looks silly, as if the turtle's head were stuck in a plastic bucket. "We must leave the hat here and forget that we found it," says the first turtle, with fairness in mind. The other turtle's gaze shifts left. It wants that hat. Readers of the earlier stories will recognize that look; it bodes ill. Klassen divides the book into three distinct acts; in the second, as the turtles watch the sunset, the second turtle's eyes again stray toward the hat. Uh-oh. In the third section, the first turtle settles down to sleep, and the shifty-eyed turtle begins inching toward the hat, talking all the while to the first turtle ("Are you all the way asleep?"). Readers who think they know what's coming will be wrong: the conclusion doesn't involve sharing, peacemaking, or violence. Instead, Klassen considers the instant at which a decision to act can break either way, depending on who's tempted and whether anyone else is watching. In contrast to the first two books, which relied on a certain conspiratorial menace, this one ends with a moment of grace and a sky full of stars. All three stories are about justice. It's just that justice doesn't always mean the same thing. Ages 4-8. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed 07/25/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 30, p)
  • Rounding out what is now being called the Hat Trilogy, Klassen presents the story of two tortoises that find a hat.I Want My Hat Back (2011) concerns the victim of a hat theft. The Caldecott-winning This Is Not My Hat (2012) focuses on the perpetrator of a similar crime. In each book, the picture-text dynamic implies that the hat’s rightful owner does violence to the thief at the end. This tale is both more ambiguous and less action-oriented. Two tortoises find one hat in the desert. Each tries it on; though it comically covers each tortoise’s entire head, “it looks good on both of us,” they conclude. Deciding that one hat is not enough for two tortoises, they leave it in order to watch the sunset from a nearby rock, where they later bed down. Klassen employs his customary flat, minimalist style in a desert palette, his characters’ heavy-lidded eyes doing the subtextual heavy lifting: they may say they are watching the sunset, but each is clearly thinking about the hat. The final act, in which one tortoise descends the rock toward the hat and the other, though supposedly sleeping, narrates a star-filled dream in which they both wear hats, challenges readers to construct their own endings. There are no belly laughs here, but patient children and Klassen’s fans will be fully engaged. Beguiling. (Picture book. 4-8)(Kirkus Reviews, September 15, 2016)
Awards note
American Library Association Notable Children's Book; 2017.
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10532456
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Klassen, Jon
Dewey number
813.6
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
Elementary Grade
Interest level
  • LG
  • LG
LC call number
PZ7.K6781446
LC item number
We 2016
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • -1
  • 3
Reading level
  • 1.3
  • 1.3
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Hat trilogy ;
Series volume
3
Study program name
  • Accelerated Reader
  • Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Hats
  • Turtles
  • Picture books for children
  • Hats
  • Turtles
  • Lost and found possessions
  • Hats
  • Picture books for children
  • Turtles
Target audience
juvenile
Label
We found a hat, Jon Klassen
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"A Junior Library Guild selection"--Jacket flap
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Finding the hat -- Watching the sunset -- Going to sleep
Control code
ocn934743481
Dimensions
29 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9781406347517
Lccn
2016947237
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)934743481
Label
We found a hat, Jon Klassen
Publication
Note
"A Junior Library Guild selection"--Jacket flap
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Finding the hat -- Watching the sunset -- Going to sleep
Control code
ocn934743481
Dimensions
29 cm.
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9781406347517
Lccn
2016947237
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)934743481

Library Locations

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      44.934972 -123.041775
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      395 Glen Creek Rd. NW, Salem, OR, 97304, US
      44.950761 -123.048683
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      515 N First Avenue, Stayton, OR, 97383, US
      44.799165 -122.794497
    • Woodburn Public LibraryBorrow it
      280 Garfield Street, Woodburn, OR, 97071, US
      45.143305 -122.858355
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