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The Resource The souvenir : a daughter discovers her father's war, by Louise Steinman

The souvenir : a daughter discovers her father's war, by Louise Steinman

Label
The souvenir : a daughter discovers her father's war
Title
The souvenir
Title remainder
a daughter discovers her father's war
Statement of responsibility
by Louise Steinman
Title variation
souvenir
Title variation remainder
a daughter discovers her fathers war
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "When Louise Steinman was growing up, her father never talked about his experiences in the Pacific during WWII. All she knew was that Asian food was banned from the house and that she was never to cry in front of him. Years later, she made a chance discovery. Hidden among her late parent's belongings was an old ammunition box; inside were almost five hundred letters her father had written to her mother during the war and a silk Japanese flag inscribed in elegant calligraphy, "To Yoshio Shimizu given to him in the Greater East Asia War to be fought to the end. If you believe in it, you win." Who was Yoshio Shimizu, and why did her father have his flag?"
  • "The Souvenir is Steinman's quest to find out what happened to her father, the men he fought with, and the men he fought against. She crosses the world to the snow country of Japan to find the family of Yoshio Shimizu and return his flag. She visits the battlefield in the Philippines where her father and the men of his Twenty-fifth Infantry Division fought in a brutal campaign that set a record for consecutive days of combat." "From her conversations with veterans on both sides of the war, she comes to appreciate the life of a soldier and discovers, through her father's letters, the man she never knew - one who was brave, passionate, and scared. And, astonishingly, she develops a kinship with the surviving family of his enemy."
  • "Weaving together her father's raw, poignant letters with her own journey, Steinman presents a view of how war changed one generation and shaped another."--Jacket
Review
  • When Norman Steinman—a member of the 25th Infantry Division, which fought in the Philippines in 1945—died in 1990, he left behind a box fullof WWII letters (more than 400), later discovered by his daughter. Among the souvenirs was a small Japanese flag, inscribed with words Louise could not read. She had them translated and found that the flag had belonged to a Japanese soldier. Obsessed, Steinman began her search for him or his family. This small book, a moving memoir about reconciliation and honor, is her tale of her successful quest, her trip to Japan to return the flag and the friendships she forged along the way. Steinman visited the battlefields on Luzon in which her father battled the weather, jungle and Japanese. This volume contains many of his letters, published here for the first time, that show typical G.I. behavior, attitudes toward the enemy and longing for good food and friends back home. Steinman's visit to Hiroshima helped her to understand the war from the Japanese point of view. In coming to understand her father and his postwar behavior, Steinman discovers how real WWII can become to a survivor's family. (Oct.) Forecast: This quiet, heartfelt book is the perfect contrast to all the Pearl Harbor 50th anniversary bombast, telling another side of the war's story. Baby boomers with veteran parents will relate, as will some vets. Look for solid sales. --Staff (Reviewed August 13, 2001) (Publishers Weekly, vol 248, issue 33, p295)
  • /* Starred Review */ Clearing out the family's storage locker after her father's death, Steinman discovered a rusted metal ammo box with hundreds of letters spanning the years 1941–45 that he had written to her mother—and a manila envelope with a Japanese soldier's flag. Intrigued by these "souvenirs" of a time and an experience in her father's life that she had never really understood, Steinman, cultural programs director of the Los Angeles Public Library, set out on a quest to return the flag to the family of Yoshio Shimizu, the Japanese soldier. This book is the story of the entwined "gifts" resulting from that personal journey—Steinman's discovery of a side of her father that she had never expected to share ("I never knew my father to cry") and the "softly uttered" words of the fallen soldier's mother: "You have given us back Yoshio. The government only sent sand in a box." Steinman comments that from the letters she wanted to "unravel the connection between my father's silence about the war and our family's home life." For many, her account could provide an understanding of how that war changed one generation and shaped the next. Recommended for all public libraries.—Robert C. Jones, Central Missouri State Univ., Warrensburg --Robert C. Jones (Reviewed September 1, 2001) (Library Journal, vol 126, issue 14, p197)
  • Steinman travels back in time and across the globe to capture the horrors of WWII as experienced by her father and a Japanese soldier, whom he may have killed.The author starts with childhood memories of her depressed father, Norman, a pragmatic pharmacist, who, after surviving combat in the Philippines, became emotionally withdrawn from his family. After her parents' deaths, Steinman discovers the roots of Norman's melancholy in a collection of candid letters that Norman, as a 27-year-old draftee, wrote to her mother detailing his military days—from his infantry training in Texas in 1943 to his departure from a defeated Japan in 1945. The passionate Norman of the past was frustrated by his separation from his family and the meaningless deaths of his army buddies. He was also terrified of fighting fanatical Japanese soldiers who would prefer to perform hara-kiri––ceremonial suicide––before dishonoring Emperor Hirohito with their surrender. Norman's chronology is interspersed with Steinman's own eloquent reflections in which she divulges her new sympathy for the repressed man who raised her. The narrative becomes more intriguing when Steinman finds an unsettling souvenir among the letters: a blood-stained Japanese flag, which bears the name of a soldier, Shimizu. Hoping to help others deal with grief, Steinman goes on a quest to return the flag to Shimizu's surviving family. Traveling to Japan and the Philippines, Steinman locates the graves of Norman's unlucky war buddies. She also forms friendships with Japanese citizens of Shimizu's hometown, who help her realize the heinous aftermath of America's atom-bomb attack on Hiroshima. During her journey, Steinman both unearths a complex portrait of the real Norman and acquires empathy for the postwar woes of the Japanese.An affecting memoir and a convincing plea for pacifism: Steinman's hypnotizing prose exposes the senselessness of war by showing how conflicting governments have destroyed families by ripping common people out of their homes and forcing them to kill each other. (Kirkus Reviews, August 15, 2001)
Biography type
individual biography
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
177417
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Steinman, Louise
Dewey number
  • 940.54/25
  • B
Index
no index present
LC call number
U53.S74
LC item number
S74 2001
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Steinman, Norman
  • United States
  • United States
  • Steinman, Louise
  • Steinman family
  • Steinman family
  • Steinman, Louise
  • United States
  • United States
  • Pharmacists
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Military campaigns
  • Pharmacists
  • Japan
  • Philippines
  • United States
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
a daughter discovers her father's war
Label
The souvenir : a daughter discovers her father's war, by Louise Steinman
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 235-237)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Somewhere at Sea -- Stateside -- The Pharmacist -- The Flag -- Into the Deep -- A Melancholy Slav -- Speculation -- The Gift -- Japan -- Bombs under Tokyo -- Shrine of the Peaceful Country -- Shadows -- Amazing Grace -- The Philippines -- The American Cemetery -- Journey to Balete Pass -- Promised Land -- Suibara -- Swans in the Morning -- Flyover
Control code
ocm46969914
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
xii, 241 pages
Isbn
9781565123106
Lccn
2001034342
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)46969914
Label
The souvenir : a daughter discovers her father's war, by Louise Steinman
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 235-237)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Somewhere at Sea -- Stateside -- The Pharmacist -- The Flag -- Into the Deep -- A Melancholy Slav -- Speculation -- The Gift -- Japan -- Bombs under Tokyo -- Shrine of the Peaceful Country -- Shadows -- Amazing Grace -- The Philippines -- The American Cemetery -- Journey to Balete Pass -- Promised Land -- Suibara -- Swans in the Morning -- Flyover
Control code
ocm46969914
Dimensions
22 cm
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
xii, 241 pages
Isbn
9781565123106
Lccn
2001034342
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)46969914

Library Locations

    • Monmouth Public LibraryBorrow it
      168 S Ecols St., Monmouth, OR, 97361, US
      44.848141 -123.23189
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