The Resource Prom, Laurie Halse Anderson

Prom, Laurie Halse Anderson

Label
Prom
Title
Prom
Statement of responsibility
Laurie Halse Anderson
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Eighteen-year-old Ash wants nothing to do with senior prom, but when disaster strikes and her desperate friend, Nat, needs her help to get it back on track, Ash's involvement transforms her life
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Award
YALSA Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2010
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Gr. 9-12. Ashley understands that the senior prom at her Philadelphia school is a big deal to her close friends even though she thinks it’s “stupid.” So imagine her shock at finding herself the most likely candidate to save the prom after a troubled math teacher makes off with the funds. Many of Anderson’s previous novels have been heart-wrenching accounts of teen survivors, such as the date-rape victim in Speak (1999) and the yellow fever survivor in Fever 1793 (2000). Here, though, Anderson’s bright, witty narrator is a self-professed “ordinary kid,” whose problems, while intensely felt, are as common as a burger and fries. Ashley’s as ambivalent about her gorgeous but undependable boyfriend as she is about her college prospects; her part-time job serving pizza in a rat costume is far from fulfilling; and her family, which she calls “‘no-extra-money-for-nuthin’-poor,” mortifies her (her pregnant mother’s belly “screams to the world” that her parents have sex), even as they offer love and support. In clipped chapters (some just a sentence long), Ashley tells her story in an authentic, sympathetic voice that combines gum-snapping, tell-it-like-it-is humor with honest questions about her future. The dramatic ending may be a bit over the top, but teens will love Ashley’s clear view of high-school hypocrisies, dating, and the fierce bonds of friendship. -- Gillian Engberg (BookList, 01-01-2005, p852)
  • Gr 8 Up –Ashley is (in her own words) normal–a senior from a lower-middle-class family, dating a high school dropout, and gearing up for graduation but with no plans for college. But when the new math teacher steals the prom money, Ashley–who swears she doesn't care–finds herself sucked into turning nothing into the best prom ever because it means the world to her best friend, Nat. This is a light, fast read, with "chapters" that range from one line to five pages and a narrative voice that is only a little smarter than it should be. Some secondary characters–Ashley's mother and Nat's grandmother–jump off the pages; unfortunately, the teens do not fare as well. Boyfriend TJ is a stereotypical tough boy, and Ash and Nat's other friends are there mostly as filler. But the first-person narration and the essentially personal nature of the story–Ashley finally comes into her own and proves herself successful at something other than garnering undeserved detentions–makes this a flaw that readers will overlook. In fact, the major flaw is that it's hard to believe Ashley is as bad a kid as she might have you believe. But teens are notorious for making petty misbehavior sound bigger and badder, so this could be read as further proof of just how normal she is. Those looking for another Speak (Farrar, 1999) may be disappointed, but this book will delight readers who want their realism tempered with fun.–Karyn N. Silverman, Elizabeth Irwin High School, New York City --Karyn N. Silverman (Reviewed February 1, 2005) (School Library Journal, vol 51, issue 2, p132)
  • Ashley Hannigan has her future all planned out. She'll graduate by the skin of her teeth (if she can serve the detentions she's racked up and pay her overdue book fines), and then she'll move into an apartment with her 19-year-old dropout boyfriend, T.J. The last thing on Ashley's mind is Senior Prom... but that's before a crisis hits Carceras High. After Miss Crane, the math teacher, embezzles all of the prom money, Ashley's best friend, Nat (short for Natalia), begs Ashley to help the prom committee. Before Ashley understands the full impact of what's happening, she finds herself leading a frenzied campaign to reorganize, finance and pull off a whole new prom in less than two weeks' time. This energetic novel, narrated by Ashley, offers snappy commentary about high-school life, and some priceless scenes, one of which features Ashley (who had planned to skip the dance) being barraged by hand-me-down gowns from well-meaning relatives (none of which fit). Ashley shines brightly as the heroine who saves the prom, but memorable supporting characters—Ashley's very pregnant mother (expecting her fifth child), an entourage of loud Irish aunts, and Natalia's Russian grandmother, who has Alzheimer's and a taste for canned ravioli—also add sparkle. Whether or not readers have been infected by prom fever themselves, they will be enraptured and amused by Ashley's attitude-altering, life-changing commitment to a cause. Ages 12-up. (Mar.) --Staff (Reviewed January 24, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 4, p245)
  • /* Starred Review */ Ashley thinks of herself as a normal kid: best friend next door, hot, but unreliable dropout boyfriend, parents a bit spacey, and a household barely hanging in there. She's not into the prom the way her best friend Natalia is, so when it nearly gets cancelled because a teacher has absconded with all the money, Ashley is not prepared for Nat's approach. Nat figures they can still have a prom, if they beg for stuff and get teachers to help and bribe the custodial staff and so on. Rather against her will, Ashley gets sucked into the lists in Nat's pink notebook. It delights her very pregnant mom; it makes dealing with all those detentions and uncompleted assignments even more of a chore; it focuses Nat's slightly addled Russian grandmother on dressmaking; and calls Ashley's hilarious aunts to the fore. Modern teen life just outside Philadelphia is vividly drawn in Ashley's first-person tale, and it's both screamingly funny and surprisingly tender. It's also full of sly throwaway references: oaths taken on a copy of Lord of the Rings instead of a Bible, Ash's dad singing Aerosmith, accounts that read, "he was all . . . I was all . . . then he was all." Expect teen readers to be quoting aloud to each other, and giggling. (Fiction. YA) (Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2005)
Awards note
A Junior Library Guild selection.
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
132879
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Anderson, Laurie Halse
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Interest level
UG
LC call number
PZ7.A54385
LC item number
Pr 2005
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 8
  • 12
Reading level
4.1
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader/Renaissance Learning
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Proms
  • High schools
  • Self-realization
  • Families
  • Pennsylvania
  • Proms
  • High schools
  • Schools
  • Self-realization
  • Family life
  • Pennsylvania
  • Families
  • High schools
  • Proms
  • Self-realization
  • Pennsylvania
Target audience
adolescent
Label
Prom, Laurie Halse Anderson
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocm55871125
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
215 pages
Isbn
9780670059744
Lccn
2004014974
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780670059744
System control number
(OCoLC)55871125
Label
Prom, Laurie Halse Anderson
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
ocm55871125
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
215 pages
Isbn
9780670059744
Lccn
2004014974
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780670059744
System control number
(OCoLC)55871125

Library Locations

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      515 N First Avenue, Stayton, OR, 97383, US
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    • Woodburn Public LibraryBorrow it
      280 Garfield Street, Woodburn, OR, 97071, US
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