The Resource I want my hat back, Jon Klassen

I want my hat back, Jon Klassen

Label
I want my hat back
Title
I want my hat back
Statement of responsibility
Jon Klassen
Creator
Contributor
Author
Publisher
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
A bear almost gives up his search for his missing hat until he remembers something important
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Character
Illustration
Award
  • ALA Notable Children's Book, 2012
  • E.B. White Read-Aloud Awards, Picture Book (formerly Indies' Choice Book Awards, Best New Picture Book), 2012.
  • New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Books: 2011
Review
  • Grades K-2 Klassen, who illustrated Caroline Stutson’s Cats’ Night Out (2010), pens his first story in this odd, and oddly charming, picture book. A bummed-out bear asks if other animals have seen his lost hat. The fox knows nothing. Neither does the frog. Or the rabbit who is wearing a pointy red hat. No luck with the turtle, snake, or armadillo either. Kids will probably be squirming in their seats at this point, just dying to tell the bear what he missed three page turns ago, but then a reindeer jogs Bear’s memory by asking what the hat looks like (red, pointy). He runs back to confront the rabbit, and when a squirrel asks him later if he has seen a hat-wearing rabbit, Bear is all innocence: “I haven’t seen any rabbits anywhere. I would not eat a rabbit. Don’t ask me any more questions.” This is, obviously, a dark turn, but there is no denying that the devious humor is right at a child’s level. He is a bear, after all; we should be happy he didn’t gobble up the rest of the cast. -- Chipman, Ian (Reviewed 11-01-2011) (Booklist, vol 108, number 5, p77)
  • Gr 1 – 3 — Readers may be too young to know Nixon's famous line, "I am not a crook," but they'll surely figure out that someone here is not telling the truth. Bear has lost his hat and asks various creatures if they have seen it, with pronounced civility. Snake goes offtrack (and will also throw inattentive listeners offtrack) by announcing he's seen a blue and round hat. Rabbit vigorously denies having seen anything like it, despite evidence to the contrary. Armadillo asks, "What is a hat?" Bear is flung into despair until a young deer asks, "What does your hat look like?" Bear starts to describe it and immediately realizes he has seen it. The following page is painted red with anger. Readers realize they have seen it, too! Bear confronts the culprit and what happens next is a matter of interpretation. Violence is implied, but only indirectly. The Chinese ink illustrations are understated and stylized, and the pages are a natural sandy hue throughout. The dialogue is not in quotations but in contrasting colors. Wisps of grass, rocks, small branches, and specks of dirt compose the setting. Read aloud, this story will offer many sublime insights into how young readers comprehend an illustrated text that leaves out vital information, and will leave young sleuths reeling with theories about what just happened.—Sara Lissa Paulson, American Sign Language and English Lower School PS 347, New York City --Sara Lissa Paulson (Reviewed August 1, 2011) (School Library Journal, vol 57, issue 8, p78)
  • /* Starred Review */ In his first outing as an author, Klassen's (Cats' Night Out) words and artwork are deliberately understated, with delectable results. Digitally manipulated ink paintings show a slow-witted bear asking half a dozen forest animals if they've seen his hat. Unadorned lines of type, printed without quotation marks or attributions, parallel the sparse lines Klassen uses for the forest's greenery. Most of the answers the bear gets are no help ("What's a hat?" one animal asks), but the rabbit's answer arouses suspicion: "I haven't seen any hats anywhere. I would not steal a hat. Don't ask me any more questions." In a classic double-take, the bear doesn't notice the hat on the rabbit's head until several pages on: "I have seen my hat," he realizes, wide-eyed. Readers with delicate sensibilities may object to the implied conclusion ("I would not eat a rabbit," the bear says stoutly, his hat back on his head, the forest floor showing signs of a scuffle), but there is no objecting to Klassen's skillful characterizations; though they're simply drawn and have little to say, each animal emerges fully realized. A noteworthy debut. Ages 4–8. (Sept.) --Staff (Reviewed July 4, 2011) (Publishers Weekly, vol 258, issue 27, p)
  • Klassen's coy effort combines spare illustration, simple, repetitive text and a "payback's a bear" plot. A somber, sepia-toned bear longs for his missing hat and questions a series of forest animals about its whereabouts. While everyone denies seeing it, a rabbit (sporting, readers will note, a pointy red chapeau) protests a bit too indignantly. Ten pages on, as the bear describes his hat for a solicitous deer, realization hits: "I HAVE SEEN MY HAT." The accompanying illustration shows the indignant bear suffused in the page's angry red. There's the subsequent dash and confrontation, followed by bear in hat and rabbit—well, nowhere to be seen. Klassen's ink-and-digital creatures, similarly almond-eyed and mouth-less, appear stiff and minimalist against creamy white space. Foliage is suggested with a few ink strokes (though it's quite bashed-up after rabbit goes missing). The text type, New Century Schoolbook, intentionally evokes the visually comfy, eminently readable design of 1960s children's primers. Font colors correlate with the animals' dialogue as well as the illustrations' muted color palette, and the four-sentence denials (first rabbit's, then bear's) structurally echo each other. Indubitably hip, this will find plenty of admirers. Others might react to a certain moral vapidity. And the littlest ones will demand to know where the heck that rabbit went. Cynical on wry. (Picture book. 4-7)(Kirkus Reviews, August 1, 2011)
Awards note
  • Theodor Seuss Geisel Beginning Reader Honor, 2012
  • E.B. White Read Aloud Award, 2012
  • Bank Street Irma Black Awards, 2012
  • ALA Notable Children's Books, 2012
  • The Horn Book Fanfare, 2012
  • New York Times Book Review Best Illustrated Children's Books, 2011
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10014469
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Klassen, Jon
Dewey number
[E]
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
no index present
Intended audience
Elementary Grade
Interest level
LG K-3
LC call number
  • PR9199.4.K5755
  • PZ7.K6781446
LC item number
  • I8 2011
  • Iap 2011
Literary form
novels
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 1
  • 3
NLM call number
Kla
Reading level
1.0
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Candlewick Press
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
I want my hat back novel
Series volume
book 1
Study program name
Accelerated reader
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Bears
  • Hats
  • Animals
  • Wit and humor, Juvenile
  • Bears
  • Hats
  • Lost and found possessions
  • Animals
  • Bears
  • Hats
  • Wit and humor, Juvenile
Target audience
preschool
Label
I want my hat back, Jon Klassen
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Manufacture
Note
"A Junior Library Guild selection"--Jacket flap
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
ocn682902500
Dimensions
29 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780763655983
Lccn
2010042793
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780763655983
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)682902500
Label
I want my hat back, Jon Klassen
Link
Publication
Manufacture
Note
"A Junior Library Guild selection"--Jacket flap
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • still image
  • text
Content type code
  • sti
  • txt
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Control code
ocn682902500
Dimensions
29 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
1 volume (unpaged)
Isbn
9780763655983
Lccn
2010042793
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other control number
9780763655983
Other physical details
color illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)682902500

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