The Resource Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876, William Chauncy Langdon

Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876, William Chauncy Langdon

Label
Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876
Title
Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876
Statement of responsibility
William Chauncy Langdon
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Everyday things of this period were boats of various kinds ... the conveyances of roads and of railroads for land travel, and the appliances rendered possible by steam for use in mining, agriculture
Cataloging source
VYG
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1871-1947
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Langdon, William Chauncy
Dewey number
973.5
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E161.L32
Literary form
non fiction
NAL call number
280.12
NAL item number
L25
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • Manners and customs
  • United States
  • Antiques
  • United States
Label
Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876, William Chauncy Langdon
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 383-384) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Flatboats for the rice crop
  • The South Carolina "patroon"
  • Cotton-laden flatboats
  • II.
  • Early roads and turnpikes
  • From horse trail to corduroy road
  • Travellers over the corduroy
  • The Plank road
  • The Turnpike
  • Roads bring an expanding horizon
  • I.
  • The McAdam turnpike
  • The-
  • Toll gate
  • Advantages of the turnpike
  • III.
  • The Directing power
  • Early river commerce
  • Early plans for canals
  • The Spirit of cooperation
  • The Settlers need markets
  • The Eastern river craft
  • Robert Morris's reports
  • The Force of the Constitution
  • IV.
  • Covered bridges
  • Crossing streams at fords
  • Single-plank bridges
  • Problem of bridging wide streams
  • Burr's king-post truss
  • Toll bridges
  • Roofs for bridges
  • Logs and rafts from Maine
  • Bridges built to last
  • V.
  • The Cumberland-National Road
  • Need for roads
  • The General route laid out
  • The Cumberland road in politics
  • The Road extended west
  • Conestoga wagons on the highway
  • Conestoga horses and their harnesses
  • The Old wagoners and their recreations
  • Dories for Massachusetts fishermen
  • The Stagecoach
  • The Postilion
  • The Stage driver a personage
  • Inns and taverns on the road
  • The Road carries America over the mountains
  • VI.
  • Great water highways into the west
  • The Adaptable raft
  • Pirogue, bateau, and keelboat
  • Ark, flatboat, barge and packet
  • Gundalows
  • Fitch's steamboat
  • Fulton-Livingston partnership
  • The Experimental steamboat
  • The Clermont's first voyage
  • Steamboats to New Orleans
  • Clippers at sea
  • VII.
  • When canals had their day
  • The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
  • The Pennsylvania Canal
  • Keelboats in the Mohawk and Susquehanna
  • A "Canal trip" over the mountains
  • Passengers on the canal
  • The Erie Canal
  • Population along the canals
  • VIII.
  • When trading was retail
  • The Peddler
  • The Old-time general store
  • Barter and cash
  • Beginning of specialty stores
  • The Chesapeake Bay log canoe
  • Advertising in the newspapers
  • The "Conner"
  • Cheaper newspapers
  • The New York Sun
  • The New York Herald
  • Greely founds The Tribune
  • X.
  • Home-life : downstairs
  • The Dining room and its furniture
  • Hearty meals
  • The Pantry
  • The Kitchen
  • IX.
  • Early cook books
  • The Hall and the stairway
  • The Dignity of the parlor and its furnishings
  • The Study
  • XI.
  • Home-life : upstairs
  • The Bedrooms
  • Fireplaces and stoves
  • From candlelight through lamp light to gas light
  • The Bathroom
  • What's new and the newspapers
  • Decoration
  • The Daguerreotype
  • Panoramic wallpaper
  • XIII.
  • Clothes and their material
  • Flax and cotton
  • Linsey-woolsey
  • Weaving linen cloth
  • Sheep-raising
  • Sheep's wool into warm cloth
  • Newspapers of the early period
  • The Stevens textile mills
  • The Cotton gin
  • Cotton manufacturing
  • Cotton prints
  • Fashions for men and for women
  • The Sewing machine
  • Mr. Butterick's first pattern
  • XIII.
  • The Leading metals
  • The Mining industries
  • Growth of newspapers
  • Lake Superior copper
  • Copper utensils and nails
  • Various kinds of coal
  • Prejudice against anthracite
  • Mining and transporting
  • The Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company
  • Coal a booming industry
  • Smelting iron
  • Coke
  • The Bessemer process
  • Improved printing presses
  • XIV.
  • Horse-power in agriculture
  • The Scythe
  • The Cradle
  • Binding sheaves by hand
  • Threshing by flail and by horse
  • Harvesting east and west
  • Hussey's reaper
  • The McCormick reaper
  • XV.
  • Hamilton's newspaper
  • Steam in transportation
  • Early roads
  • The First "rail-roads" were horse propelled
  • Oliver Evans's "Orukter Amphibolos"
  • John Stevens's steam railroad
  • The Pennsylvania Railroad
  • The Baltimore & Ohio
  • Peter Cooper's steam engine
  • The New York Central develops
  • Dickens on the American railroad
  • The Political press
  • The Idea of a transcontinental railroad
  • Lincoln and the Union Pacific
  • XVI.
  • Celebrating a hundred years
  • County and state fairs
  • The Idea of an International Exhibition
  • The Exhibition buildings
  • Music at the exhibition
  • The Opening and closing ceremonies
  • The Independent newspaper
Control code
ocm04918475
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
398 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)4918475
Label
Everyday things in American life, 1776-1876, William Chauncy Langdon
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 383-384) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Flatboats for the rice crop
  • The South Carolina "patroon"
  • Cotton-laden flatboats
  • II.
  • Early roads and turnpikes
  • From horse trail to corduroy road
  • Travellers over the corduroy
  • The Plank road
  • The Turnpike
  • Roads bring an expanding horizon
  • I.
  • The McAdam turnpike
  • The-
  • Toll gate
  • Advantages of the turnpike
  • III.
  • The Directing power
  • Early river commerce
  • Early plans for canals
  • The Spirit of cooperation
  • The Settlers need markets
  • The Eastern river craft
  • Robert Morris's reports
  • The Force of the Constitution
  • IV.
  • Covered bridges
  • Crossing streams at fords
  • Single-plank bridges
  • Problem of bridging wide streams
  • Burr's king-post truss
  • Toll bridges
  • Roofs for bridges
  • Logs and rafts from Maine
  • Bridges built to last
  • V.
  • The Cumberland-National Road
  • Need for roads
  • The General route laid out
  • The Cumberland road in politics
  • The Road extended west
  • Conestoga wagons on the highway
  • Conestoga horses and their harnesses
  • The Old wagoners and their recreations
  • Dories for Massachusetts fishermen
  • The Stagecoach
  • The Postilion
  • The Stage driver a personage
  • Inns and taverns on the road
  • The Road carries America over the mountains
  • VI.
  • Great water highways into the west
  • The Adaptable raft
  • Pirogue, bateau, and keelboat
  • Ark, flatboat, barge and packet
  • Gundalows
  • Fitch's steamboat
  • Fulton-Livingston partnership
  • The Experimental steamboat
  • The Clermont's first voyage
  • Steamboats to New Orleans
  • Clippers at sea
  • VII.
  • When canals had their day
  • The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal
  • The Pennsylvania Canal
  • Keelboats in the Mohawk and Susquehanna
  • A "Canal trip" over the mountains
  • Passengers on the canal
  • The Erie Canal
  • Population along the canals
  • VIII.
  • When trading was retail
  • The Peddler
  • The Old-time general store
  • Barter and cash
  • Beginning of specialty stores
  • The Chesapeake Bay log canoe
  • Advertising in the newspapers
  • The "Conner"
  • Cheaper newspapers
  • The New York Sun
  • The New York Herald
  • Greely founds The Tribune
  • X.
  • Home-life : downstairs
  • The Dining room and its furniture
  • Hearty meals
  • The Pantry
  • The Kitchen
  • IX.
  • Early cook books
  • The Hall and the stairway
  • The Dignity of the parlor and its furnishings
  • The Study
  • XI.
  • Home-life : upstairs
  • The Bedrooms
  • Fireplaces and stoves
  • From candlelight through lamp light to gas light
  • The Bathroom
  • What's new and the newspapers
  • Decoration
  • The Daguerreotype
  • Panoramic wallpaper
  • XIII.
  • Clothes and their material
  • Flax and cotton
  • Linsey-woolsey
  • Weaving linen cloth
  • Sheep-raising
  • Sheep's wool into warm cloth
  • Newspapers of the early period
  • The Stevens textile mills
  • The Cotton gin
  • Cotton manufacturing
  • Cotton prints
  • Fashions for men and for women
  • The Sewing machine
  • Mr. Butterick's first pattern
  • XIII.
  • The Leading metals
  • The Mining industries
  • Growth of newspapers
  • Lake Superior copper
  • Copper utensils and nails
  • Various kinds of coal
  • Prejudice against anthracite
  • Mining and transporting
  • The Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company
  • Coal a booming industry
  • Smelting iron
  • Coke
  • The Bessemer process
  • Improved printing presses
  • XIV.
  • Horse-power in agriculture
  • The Scythe
  • The Cradle
  • Binding sheaves by hand
  • Threshing by flail and by horse
  • Harvesting east and west
  • Hussey's reaper
  • The McCormick reaper
  • XV.
  • Hamilton's newspaper
  • Steam in transportation
  • Early roads
  • The First "rail-roads" were horse propelled
  • Oliver Evans's "Orukter Amphibolos"
  • John Stevens's steam railroad
  • The Pennsylvania Railroad
  • The Baltimore & Ohio
  • Peter Cooper's steam engine
  • The New York Central develops
  • Dickens on the American railroad
  • The Political press
  • The Idea of a transcontinental railroad
  • Lincoln and the Union Pacific
  • XVI.
  • Celebrating a hundred years
  • County and state fairs
  • The Idea of an International Exhibition
  • The Exhibition buildings
  • Music at the exhibition
  • The Opening and closing ceremonies
  • The Independent newspaper
Control code
ocm04918475
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
398 pages
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(OCoLC)4918475

Library Locations

    • Monmouth Public LibraryBorrow it
      168 S Ecols St., Monmouth, OR, 97361, US
      44.848141 -123.23189
Processing Feedback ...