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The Resource Chemistry workbook for dummies, by Peter J. Mikulecky, PhD, and Christopher Hren

Chemistry workbook for dummies, by Peter J. Mikulecky, PhD, and Christopher Hren

Label
Chemistry workbook for dummies
Title
Chemistry workbook for dummies
Statement of responsibility
by Peter J. Mikulecky, PhD, and Christopher Hren
Creator
Contributor
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Hundreds of practice problems to help you conquer chemistry. Are you confounded by chemistry? Subject by subject, problem by problem, Chemistry Workbook For Dummies lends a helping hand so you can make sense of this often-intimidating subject. Packed with hundreds of practice problems that cover the gamut of everything you'll encounter in your introductory chemistry course, this hands-on guide will have you working your way through basic chemistry in no time. You can pick and choose the chapters and types of problems that challenge you the most, or you can work from cover to cover. With plenty of practice problems on everything from matter and molecules to moles and measurements, Chemistry Workbook For Dummieshas everything you need to score higher in chemistry
Member of
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mikulecky, Peter
Dewey number
540
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QD33.2
LC item number
.C49 2015
Literary form
non fiction
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Hren, Christopher R
Series statement
--For dummies
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry
  • Chemistry
Label
Chemistry workbook for dummies, by Peter J. Mikulecky, PhD, and Christopher Hren
Link
http://www.dummies.com/cheatsheet/chemistrywb
Instantiates
Publication
Note
  • Previous edition: 2008
  • Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • pt. I. Getting cozy with numbers, atoms, and elements -- 1. Noting numbers scientifically -- Using exponential and scientific notation to report measurements -- Multiplying and dividing in scientific notation -- Using exponential notation to add and subtract -- distinguishing between accuracy and precision -- Expressing precision with significant figures-- doing arithmetic with significant figures -- 2. Using and converting units -- Familiarizing yourself with base units and metric system prefixes -- Building derived units from base units -- Converting between units : the conversion factor -- Letting the units guide you -- 3. Breaking down atoms -- The atom : protons, electrons, and neutrons -- Deciphering chemical symbols : atomic and mass numbers -- Accounting for isotopes using atomic masses -- 4. Surveying the Periodic Table of the Elements -- Organizing the Periodic Table into periods and groups -- Predicting properties from periodic and group trends -- Seeking stability with valence electrons by forming ions -- Putting electrons in t heir places : electron configurations -- Measuring the amount of energy (or light) an excited electron emits --
  • pt. II. Making and remaking compounds -- 5. Building bonds -- Pairing charges with ionic bonds -- Sharing electrons with covalent bonds -- Occupying and overlapping molecular orbitals -- Polarity : sharing electrons unevenly -- Shaping molecules : VSEPR theory and hybridization -- 6. Naming compounds and writing formulas -- Labeling ionic compounds and writing their formulas -- Getting a grip on ionic compounds with polyatomic ions -- Naming molecular (covalent) compounds and writing their formulas -- Addressing acids -- Mixing the rules for naming and formula writing -- Beyond the basics : naming organic carbon chains -- 7. Understanding the many uses of the mole -- The mole conversion factor : Avogadro's number -- Doing mass and volume mole conversions -- Determining percent composition -- Calculating empirical formulas -- Using empirical formulas to find molecular formulas -- 8. Getting a grip on chemical equations -- Translating chemistry into equations and symbols -- Balancing chemical equations -- Recognizing reactions and predicting products -- Combination (synthesis) -- Decomposition -- Single replacement (single displacement) -- Combustion -- Canceling spectator ions : net ionic equations -- 9. Putting stoichiometry to work -- Using mole-mole conversions from balanced equations -- PUtting moles at the center : conversions involving particles, volumes, and masses -- Limiting your reagents -- Percent yield calculations --
  • pt. III. Examining changes in terms of energy -- 10. Understanding states in terms of energy -- Describing states of matter with the kinetic molecular theory -- Figuring out phase transitions and diagrams -- 11. Obeying gas laws -- Boyle's Law : playing with pressure and volume -- Charles's Law and absolute zero : looking at volume and temperature -- The combined and ideal gas laws : working with pressure, volume, and temperature -- Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures -- Diffusing and effusing with Graham's Law -- 12. Dissolving into solutions -- Seeing different forces at work in solubility -- Concentrating on molarity and percent solutions -- Changing concentrations by making dilutions -- Altering solubility with temperature -- 13. Playing hot and cold : colligative properties -- Portioning particles : molality and mole fractions -- Elevating and calculating boiling points -- Depressing and calculating freezing points -- Determining molecular masses with boiling and freezing points -- 14. Exploring rates and equilibrium -- Measuring rates -- Focusing on factors that affect rates -- Measuring equilibrium -- The equilibrium constant -- Free energy -- 15. Warming up to thermochemistry -- Understanding the basics of thermodynamics -- working with specific heat capacity and calorimetry -- Absorbing and releasing heat : endothermic and exothermic reactions -- Summing heats with Hess's Law --
  • pt. IV. Swapping charges -- 16. Working with acids and bases -- Surveying three complementary methods for defining acids and bases -- Arrhenius sticks to the basics -- Brønsted-Lowry tackles bases without a hydroxide ion -- Lewis relies on electron pairs -- Measuring acidity and basicity : pH, pOH, and K(w )-- K(a) and K(b) : finding strength through dissociation -- 17. Achieving neutrality with titrations and buffers -- Concentrating on titration to figure out molarity -- Maintaining your pH with buffers -- Measuring salt solubility with K(sp) -- 18. Accounting for electrons in redox -- Oxidation numbers : keeping t abs on electrons -- Balancing redox reactions under acidic conditions -- Balancing redox reactions under basic conditions -- 19. Galvanizing yourself to do electrochemistry -- Identifying anodes and cathodes -- Calculating electromotive force and standard reduction potentials -- Coupling current to chemistry : electrolytic cells -- 20. Doing chemistry with atomic nuclei -- decaying nuclei in different ways -- Alpha decay -- Beta decay -- Gamma decay -- Measuring rates of decay : half-lives -- Making and breaking nuclei : fusion and fission --
  • pt. V. The part of tens -- 21. Ten chemistry formulas to tattoo to your brain -- 22. Ten annoying exceptions to chemistry rules
Control code
ocn880199423
Dimensions
28 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
viii, 302 pages
Isbn
9781118940044
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
bill.
System control number
(OCoLC)880199423
Label
Chemistry workbook for dummies, by Peter J. Mikulecky, PhD, and Christopher Hren
Link
http://www.dummies.com/cheatsheet/chemistrywb
Publication
Note
  • Previous edition: 2008
  • Includes index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • pt. I. Getting cozy with numbers, atoms, and elements -- 1. Noting numbers scientifically -- Using exponential and scientific notation to report measurements -- Multiplying and dividing in scientific notation -- Using exponential notation to add and subtract -- distinguishing between accuracy and precision -- Expressing precision with significant figures-- doing arithmetic with significant figures -- 2. Using and converting units -- Familiarizing yourself with base units and metric system prefixes -- Building derived units from base units -- Converting between units : the conversion factor -- Letting the units guide you -- 3. Breaking down atoms -- The atom : protons, electrons, and neutrons -- Deciphering chemical symbols : atomic and mass numbers -- Accounting for isotopes using atomic masses -- 4. Surveying the Periodic Table of the Elements -- Organizing the Periodic Table into periods and groups -- Predicting properties from periodic and group trends -- Seeking stability with valence electrons by forming ions -- Putting electrons in t heir places : electron configurations -- Measuring the amount of energy (or light) an excited electron emits --
  • pt. II. Making and remaking compounds -- 5. Building bonds -- Pairing charges with ionic bonds -- Sharing electrons with covalent bonds -- Occupying and overlapping molecular orbitals -- Polarity : sharing electrons unevenly -- Shaping molecules : VSEPR theory and hybridization -- 6. Naming compounds and writing formulas -- Labeling ionic compounds and writing their formulas -- Getting a grip on ionic compounds with polyatomic ions -- Naming molecular (covalent) compounds and writing their formulas -- Addressing acids -- Mixing the rules for naming and formula writing -- Beyond the basics : naming organic carbon chains -- 7. Understanding the many uses of the mole -- The mole conversion factor : Avogadro's number -- Doing mass and volume mole conversions -- Determining percent composition -- Calculating empirical formulas -- Using empirical formulas to find molecular formulas -- 8. Getting a grip on chemical equations -- Translating chemistry into equations and symbols -- Balancing chemical equations -- Recognizing reactions and predicting products -- Combination (synthesis) -- Decomposition -- Single replacement (single displacement) -- Combustion -- Canceling spectator ions : net ionic equations -- 9. Putting stoichiometry to work -- Using mole-mole conversions from balanced equations -- PUtting moles at the center : conversions involving particles, volumes, and masses -- Limiting your reagents -- Percent yield calculations --
  • pt. III. Examining changes in terms of energy -- 10. Understanding states in terms of energy -- Describing states of matter with the kinetic molecular theory -- Figuring out phase transitions and diagrams -- 11. Obeying gas laws -- Boyle's Law : playing with pressure and volume -- Charles's Law and absolute zero : looking at volume and temperature -- The combined and ideal gas laws : working with pressure, volume, and temperature -- Dalton's Law of Partial Pressures -- Diffusing and effusing with Graham's Law -- 12. Dissolving into solutions -- Seeing different forces at work in solubility -- Concentrating on molarity and percent solutions -- Changing concentrations by making dilutions -- Altering solubility with temperature -- 13. Playing hot and cold : colligative properties -- Portioning particles : molality and mole fractions -- Elevating and calculating boiling points -- Depressing and calculating freezing points -- Determining molecular masses with boiling and freezing points -- 14. Exploring rates and equilibrium -- Measuring rates -- Focusing on factors that affect rates -- Measuring equilibrium -- The equilibrium constant -- Free energy -- 15. Warming up to thermochemistry -- Understanding the basics of thermodynamics -- working with specific heat capacity and calorimetry -- Absorbing and releasing heat : endothermic and exothermic reactions -- Summing heats with Hess's Law --
  • pt. IV. Swapping charges -- 16. Working with acids and bases -- Surveying three complementary methods for defining acids and bases -- Arrhenius sticks to the basics -- Brønsted-Lowry tackles bases without a hydroxide ion -- Lewis relies on electron pairs -- Measuring acidity and basicity : pH, pOH, and K(w )-- K(a) and K(b) : finding strength through dissociation -- 17. Achieving neutrality with titrations and buffers -- Concentrating on titration to figure out molarity -- Maintaining your pH with buffers -- Measuring salt solubility with K(sp) -- 18. Accounting for electrons in redox -- Oxidation numbers : keeping t abs on electrons -- Balancing redox reactions under acidic conditions -- Balancing redox reactions under basic conditions -- 19. Galvanizing yourself to do electrochemistry -- Identifying anodes and cathodes -- Calculating electromotive force and standard reduction potentials -- Coupling current to chemistry : electrolytic cells -- 20. Doing chemistry with atomic nuclei -- decaying nuclei in different ways -- Alpha decay -- Beta decay -- Gamma decay -- Measuring rates of decay : half-lives -- Making and breaking nuclei : fusion and fission --
  • pt. V. The part of tens -- 21. Ten chemistry formulas to tattoo to your brain -- 22. Ten annoying exceptions to chemistry rules
Control code
ocn880199423
Dimensions
28 cm.
Edition
2nd ed.
Extent
viii, 302 pages
Isbn
9781118940044
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
bill.
System control number
(OCoLC)880199423

Library Locations

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      585 Liberty Street SE, Salem, OR, 97301, US
      44.934972 -123.041775
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